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Rule 502.4. Venue - Where A Lawsuit May Be Brought (2013)

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(a) Applicable Law. Laws specifying the venue the county and precinct where a lawsuit may be brought are found in Chapter 15, Subchapter E of the Texas Civil Practice and Remedies Code, which is available online and for examination during the court's business hours.
(b) General Rule. Generally, a defendant in a small claims case as described in Rule 500.3(a) or a debt claim case as described in Rule 500.3(b) is entitled to be sued in one of the following venues:
    (1) the county and precinct where the defendant resides;
    (2) the county and precinct where the incident, or the majority of incidents, that gave rise to the claim occurred;
    (3) the county and precinct where the contract or agreement, if any, that gave rise to the claim was to be performed; or
    (4) the county and precinct where the property is located, in a suit to recover personal property.
(c) Non-Resident Defendant; Defendant's Residence Unknown. If the defendant is a non-resident of Texas, or if defendant's residence is unknown, the plaintiff may file the suit in the county and precinct where the plaintiff resides.
(d) Motion to Transfer Venue. If a plaintiff files suit in an improper venue, a defendant may challenge the venue selected by filing a motion to transfer venue. The motion must be filed before trial, no later than 21 days after the day the defendant's answer is filed, and must contain a sworn statement that the venue chosen by the plaintiff is improper and a specific county and precinct of proper venue to which transfer is sought. If the defendant fails to name a county and precinct, the court must instruct the defendant to do so and allow the defendant 7 days to cure the defect. If the defendant fails to correct the defect, the motion will be denied, and the case will proceed in the county and precinct where it was originally filed.
    (1) Procedure.
      (A) Judge to Set Hearing. If a defendant files a motion to transfer venue, the judge must set a hearing on the motion.
      (B) Response. A plaintiff may file a response to a defendant's motion to transfer venue.
      (C) Hearing. The parties may present evidence at the hearing. A witness may testify at a hearing, either in person or, with permission of the court, by means of telephone or an electronic communication system.
      (D) Judge's Decision. If the motion is granted, the judge must sign an order designating the court to which the case will be transferred. If the motion is denied, the case will be heard in the court in which the plaintiff initially filed suit.
      (E) Review. Motions for rehearing and interlocutory appeals of the judge's ruling on venue are not permitted.
      (F) Time for Trial of the Case. No trial may be held until at least the 14th day after the judge's ruling on the motion to transfer venue.
      (G) Order. An order granting a motion to transfer venue must state the reason for the transfer and the name of the court to which the transfer is made. When such an order of transfer is made, the judge who issued the order must immediately make out a true and correct transcript of all the entries made on the docket in the case, certify the transcript, and send the transcript, with a certified copy of the bill of costs and the original papers in the case, to the court in the precinct to which the case has been transferred. The court receiving the case must then notify the plaintiff that the case has been received and, if the case is transferred to a different county, that the plaintiff has 14 days after receiving the notice to pay the filing fee in the new court, or file a sworn statement of inability to pay. The plaintiff is not entitled to a refund of any fees already paid. Failure to pay the fee or file a sworn statement of inability to pay will result in dismissal of the case without prejudice.
(e) Fair Trial Venue Change. If a party believes it cannot get a fair trial in a specific precinct or before a specific judge, the party may file a sworn motion stating such, supported by the sworn statements of two other credible persons, and specifying if the party is requesting a change of location or a change of judge. Except for good cause shown, this motion must be filed no less than 7 days before trial. If the party seeks a change of judge, the judge must exchange benches with another qualified justice of the peace, or if no judge is available to exchange benches, the county judge must appoint a visiting judge to hear the case. If the party seeks a change in location, the case must be transferred to the nearest justice court in the county that is not subject to the same or some other disqualification. If there is only one justice of the peace precinct in the county, then the judge must exchange benches with another qualified justice of the peace, or if no judge is available to exchange benches, the county judge must appoint a visiting judge to hear the case. In cases where exclusive jurisdiction is within a specific precinct, as in eviction cases, the only remedy available is a change of judge. A party may apply for relief under this rule only one time in any given lawsuit.
(f) Transfer of Venue by Consent. On the written consent of all parties or their attorneys, filed with the court, venue must be transferred to the court of any other justice of the peace of the county, or any other county.

Added by order of April 15th, 2013, eff. Aug. 31, 2013.

AMENDMENTS